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Page 69 ■ BPI COMMUNICATIONS • Chairman & CEO: GERALD S. in fact, Europe now supplies much of the market for illegal CDs in the U. Con- sequently, last year RIAA pushed for pas- sage of a felony anti-bootleg law, as part of GATT implementation, that allows U. customs officials to seize illicit shipments at the border. RIAA has sent more than 600 educational letters to DJ companies around the coun- try, and in March we assisted in the sei- zure of nearly 5,000 alleged pirated dance mix CDs from an entertainment company in Pennsylvania.New technological developments are rapidly changing the CD market in dra- matic ways, and the RIAA is working to ensure that pirates don't cash in on these changes.IN THE NEWS Garth Brooks Campaigns For The Arts In D. SEE PAGE 1 2 THE INTERNATIONAL NEWSWEEKLY OF MUSIC. KIAA executive VP and director of anti-piracy operations, "For the first time in recent history, industry losses have gone down." D'Onofrio says that while the trade group has estimated losses from piracy activities at between 0 million and

In 1802, Wiltshire was rocked by a rising wave of disenchantment in the wool trades as the cloth-finishing "croppers" rioted against layoffs due to mechanization of the rural mills. Like some contemporary residents, the Davey brothers' par- ents make their living from home handicrafts, selling their line of custom-made wooden toys to a network of shops on the shires. Millwood, ti t, 10546 or Keren Unrve-sily Mcro- lilms. iata Director of Special Issues: Gene Sculatti, Dalet Brady. Recently, the markets for pirated Indian and Arabic music have increased; in a few years, other types of music will move to the fore.

Fit- tingly, the lessons of the road resound on all 10 tracks of the Hoax's "Sound Like This" (due April 25), the finest nativity of en- semble-style British blues-rock since Clapton & the Powerhouse cut "Crossroads" in 1966 (see the new Steve Winwood retrospec- tive, "The Finer Things," on Island). By pursuing suppliers and manufactur- ers, RIAA is significantly decreasing the source of street vendors* counterfeit mer- chandise.

The beauty of "Sound Like This" is that it's imbued with a TO MY EARS by Timothy White broad range of legendary and latter-day influences, from Free and other boughs of the Bluesbreakers family tree to vintage Fab- ulous Thunderbirds and Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Texas Flood." Yet the record still shines from a light within on such self-penned ma- terial as "Lizard Like Me," ''Headless Chicken," and first single "Scaramouch e." "The sad thing is that I was just getting into Stevie Ray and 'Texas Flood' just before he died," says Davey, "and 1 remember seeing an ad in September 1990 for a Hammersmith Odeon con- cert he never lived to give. The amount of pirated material confiscated in raids has declined markedly during the past few years because we are reducing the output of illegal factories.

"My dad grew up in the '60s and '70s and had a great collection of John Mayall & Bluesbreakers records, but my brother Jess [the Hoax's second guitarist] and I are also fans of people like Albert King, Robben Ford, and Rage Against The Machine. Associate Ed (LA.) Pro Audio/Technology: Paul Vema. Unfortunately, as long as the demand for counterfeit recordings persists, pirates will continue to provide a supply.

0 million a year in recent years, "last year we were looking at losses of from 0 million -5 million . And while programmers anxiously search for new contenders, some fret modern rock is relying too heavily on one-off and sound-alike acta thai, in the long run, could damage the newly prosperous format.VIDEO AND HOME ENTERTAINMENT APRIL 1, 1995 ADVERTl St MENTS PIRACY LOSSES SHRINK Amid Boom, Modern Rock RIAA, Laws Get Tough Radio Sights A 'Dry Spell' ■ BY CHRIS MORRIS LOS ANGELES — In the long-run ning war against bogus record- ings, the good guys are turning the tide. of America's anti-piracy division is celebrating 25 years of activity with new figures re- flecting shrinking losses to the record industry, a decline in record counterfeiting and bootlegging, ami increased activity by law enforcement organizations bol- stered by tougher statutes. Officials from the Consumer Fed- eration of America and the U. Pub- lic Interest Research Group, both with more than 1 million members na- tionwide, joined the Consumers Against Unfair Ticketing coalition, (Coiitii Hn ti on fuiijc Uti) RIAA my and few federal and state laws were in place to punish music pirates. Just as country radio rode a wave Lounge, Big-Band Era Bops Back On Indies And Majors BY CARRIE BORZILLO LOS ANGELES— A ne swinging hip- sters ire about to hit record store shelves with their retro take on musical styles such as lounge, big band, and "hot jazz." While most of the acts are new- comers, at least two veteran per- fanners have had recent successes going the retro route. However, pro- grammers says it has been several months since a dynamic record ar- rived on their desks.Tnis year, video suppliers took on the digital videodisc. RIAA's CD plant education program, which trains manufacturers to spot bogus orders, has been a textbook example of pi- racy prevention. We keep plants updated on criminal activity in the CD market, and manufacturers frequently call for assistance when they suspect wrongdo- ing.Home video editor Seth Goldstein reports on the case for VHS' longevity. There are nearly 50 CD manufacturing plants in the U. This aggressive program is the primary reason why fewer than \% of CDs in the U. are pirated — a far lower rate than in most other countries. Asia, and Latin America have witnessed increasing piracy, and. is the illegal dance mix, which fre- quently ends up in the retail marketplace.With respect to CD-R machines, measures are being put in place to track specific recordings to the particular CD-R machine that recorded the disc.

Ex- cept for our drummer, Dave [Raeburn], who came to us from a popular blues-based band in Bath called the Pink Torpedoes, the rest of the band [Amor and vocalist Hugh Colt- man] were all friends at Great Cheverell Primary School. One area of increasing supply: music from other cul- tures.But these were kids of 17 to 18 who were performing red- hot original blues when they should have been playing Lenny Kravitz covers. "Well," says Robin Davey, the mystery band's rangy bassist/ chief spokesman, "we never really had a name un- til we played a gig nearby at Easterton Village Hall in March of '91, when we had to put our name on the tickets. Lisa Collins, Larry Le Blanc, Jim Macnxe, Moira Mc Corm Kk. Much of our success was due to working with law enforcement officials to crack down on illegal manufacturers, distribu- tors, and retailers.

Ex- cept for our drummer, Dave [Raeburn], who came to us from a popular blues-based band in Bath called the Pink Torpedoes, the rest of the band [Amor and vocalist Hugh Colt- man] were all friends at Great Cheverell Primary School. One area of increasing supply: music from other cul- tures.But these were kids of 17 to 18 who were performing red- hot original blues when they should have been playing Lenny Kravitz covers. "Well," says Robin Davey, the mystery band's rangy bassist/ chief spokesman, "we never really had a name un- til we played a gig nearby at Easterton Village Hall in March of '91, when we had to put our name on the tickets. Lisa Collins, Larry Le Blanc, Jim Macnxe, Moira Mc Corm Kk. Much of our success was due to working with law enforcement officials to crack down on illegal manufacturers, distribu- tors, and retailers.